feminism

Early Feminism

Different Pathways into Feminism

As part of genderED’s ‘Voices from the Early Days’ series, Marta Kowalewska and Radhika Govinda reflect on the different locations, perspectives and pathways that led these women academics to becoming feminists in the academy. They address the following question in this post – How did the women who pioneered women’s, gender and feminist studies at the University of Edinburgh become involved with feminism?

Women’s History in the Department of Economic and Social History. Rosalind Mitchison (1919-2002) and Leah Leneman (1944-1999).

It is Women’s History month and as part of genderED’s ongoing project Voices from the Early Days, which seeks to capture the stories of pioneers of women’s, gender and feminist studies at University of Edinburgh, Stana Nenadic reflects upon the work and legacies of two leading women social and economic historians Rosalind Mitchison and Leah Leneman.

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Women’s, Gender and Feminist Studies at Edinburgh: A Window On Journeys Undertaken

Radhika Govinda kicks off the Voices from the Early Days series with her post exploring the history and future of Women’s, Gender and Feminist studies (WGFS) at the University of Edinburgh. She provides an overview of the various journeys undertaken by feminist academics at the University of Edinburgh.

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‘Doing gender’ in a private, single-sex primary school in Zimbabwe: personal observations

This blog series showcases the student winners of the Yuan Changying Prize, sponsored by genderED. The prize recognises outstanding ‘gender observations’ written by students (and nominated by tutors) in the pre-Honours course Understanding Gender in the Contemporary World, convened by Dr. Meryl Kenny and Dr. Sarah Liu. Gender observations require students to link material from the course to their own day-to-day experiences and observations of ‘doing gender’. The prize is named after Yuan Changying in consultation with students, in recognition of the first female Chinese graduate in the University of Edinburgh’s history. In the first of two winning essays, Mastercard Foundation scholar Tanatsei Gambura reflects on ‘doing gender’ in her school days in Zimbabwe.